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General Discussions
21:43 Oct-07-2012
david summerson
1510 views
starting out in NDT
I am currently about to get into the industry of NDT. I am looking at doing my eddy current course. anyone be able to give me a bit of guidance on what level i should be doin.
Note: Recently finished 2 years of an electrical apprenticeship.
 
 
22:28 Oct-07-2012

John
NDT Inspector, pipeline, ASME, AWS,
USA,
Joined Sep 2009
213
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to david summerson on 21:43 Oct-07-2012 (Opening).

I don't fully understand the question. What do you mean by "what level should I be doing"?

 
 
10:40 Oct-08-2012
Dave summerson
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to John on 22:28 Oct-07-2012 .

Thanks for the reply John
I meant should I be doing the level 1 or direct level 2? I hav an electrical background and 1 years aerospace. Is this an advantage to do the direct level 2?

 
 
12:07 Oct-08-2012
Tony
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to Dave summerson on 10:40 Oct-08-2012 .

Im confused to why someone would do an electrical apprenticeship (presumably electrician) which will lead to a skilled job and earn you far more money then NDT, then start from scratch in NDT which is at best a semi skilled job.

Sparkys start at 9 and finishing at 3 for 200 pound a day a life far more favourable then NDT.

 
 
15:25 Oct-08-2012

John
NDT Inspector, pipeline, ASME, AWS,
USA,
Joined Sep 2009
213
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to Tony on 12:07 Oct-08-2012 .

Tony, i imagine that I am not the Only one who is highly offended by your statement. Maybe you are only talking about yourself when you consider NDT as an semi-skilled trade. NDT IS MY PROFESSION. I DO NOT CONSIDER IT MY TRADE. AS FOR WAGES AND HOURS, you get what you put into it. It is not difficult to make well into the 6 figures if you are willing to work for it. It sounds like you are One who gives slackers a bad name. How many other trades have technicians recertify at regular intervals? It would be like an attorney retaking the BAR exam every three years! Most of us here understand that WE are the last line of defense in the safety of the public when it comes to plants, refineries & pipelines. What we do cannot be done by a "warm body" off the street with very little training. I have been doing my job a long time and am always learning something new, there is a constant changing of the NDT world with new methods and techniques to study and stay current with. Surely I am not the only One with this point of view.

 
 
15:51 Oct-08-2012
Tim
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to david summerson on 21:43 Oct-07-2012 (Opening).

Hello David,

Technicians generally start as Trainee and progress through Level 1, 2 & 3 certifications. Direct certification is an option, but depends on the employer's needs and the Level 3. A Level 2 can make accept/reject decisions whereas a Level 1 usually cannot. NDT is a good career in my opinion.

Best of Luck to you!

John,

Your reply to Tony is well said.

 
 
16:42 Oct-08-2012

Wieslaw Bicz
Engineering, - ,
PBP Optel sp. z o.o.,
Poland,
Joined Feb 2009
162 Stand of PBP Optel sp. z o.o.
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to Tony on 12:07 Oct-08-2012 .

The idea, that NDT is semi-skilled job is fully wrong. It can be true in the case of some simple measurements, but the results of applying this idea is growing amount of people, that think, that they are doing something correct, but the results are miserable.

Many people, that are present on this forum are good examples of this. In most cases of NDT measurements good understanding of the physics behind it is necessary and experience is crucial. It is also necessary to know, what the device, that is used here is really doing. The knowledge of the technique is very important.

My experience is showing me, that problems with under qualified people in NDT area will grow and show sometimes tragic results.

 
 
17:21 Oct-08-2012

John M. Champion
Other, UT/AUT Scanner Technician,
International Union of Operating Engineers; (NDT) Local #112 ,
USA,
Joined Apr 2009
15
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to John on 15:25 Oct-08-2012 .

Hello John...What I find "offensive" is the "personal attack" on someone that is speaking from their "opinion". As an NDT technician, I consider myself a PROFESSIONAL. I am certified as a level 2 in UT, PT, MT and am currently working toward qualifications in RT. Simply because someone is uninformed as to the true nature of the amount of study required to progress in NDT by no means requires an unprofessional "attack" on their intelligence or their "work ethic". I would suggest that at the level you have attained in NDT that you would carry yourself in a far more professional manner. You have a great deal of knowledge and understanding in the field of NDT, and I would like to suggest, that as such highly skilled individuals as NDT requires, that we take a less "offended" stance and use our knowledge to help bring a more INFORMED view to the less informed outlook of NDT.
Most respectfully,
John M. Champiion

 
 
17:57 Oct-08-2012

John
NDT Inspector, pipeline, ASME, AWS,
USA,
Joined Sep 2009
213
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to John M. Champion on 17:21 Oct-08-2012 .

I reread the previous posts after you made your "opinion" known, and I will stand by my comments. Tony did not state as an opinion, but as a factual statement that I cannot agree with. Granted, I have worked with a lot of people who were semi-skilled, the majority of them were new to the field or didnt care to advance in this field.
I find it strange that you would call me out for attacking an "opinion", while attacking mine.

 
 
18:08 Oct-08-2012

Ian S
NDT Inspector, Auditer / Cross Checker,
STS { Stork Technical Services } Australia,
Netherlands,
Joined Aug 2011
35
Re: starting out in NDT
Hi John, You beat me to it..
Semi-skilled trade ?!!!
Cheeky Ba...
 
 
18:47 Oct-08-2012

Nigel Armstrong

Engineering, - Specialist services,
United Kingdom,
Joined Oct 2000
888
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to Ian S on 18:08 Oct-08-2012 .

The only mistake I see in Tony's post is his throwaway phrase "at best" - simply not true! However he has a point in that the depth of knowledge offered/expected/needed by many NDT practitioners is not that high - even quite high end inspections may have
very limited knowledge of materials, manufacturing processes, QA.

I've often seen quoted that 90% of civil aircraft (maybe military too, but that may be a state secret) is penetrant tested, yet a Level 1 can be making significant decisions within 6 months and become a Level 2 within a year (a short period but sufficient for 95% of his/her work - sure a Level 3 may be on premises somewhere, but s/he is not necessarily involved in routine accept / reject decisions.

Yet the readth and depth of sf knowledge of SOME NDT practitioners I have met is astounding. I had the fortune to meet some people I felt humble before their accumulated knowledge and experience and I have also had an NDT boss who is a clever parrot!

No I wont take offence - it is his point of view directed I presume by his experience
and if Tony is not writing with malicious intent, why should anyone become arate at a POV?

 
 
20:25 Oct-08-2012
Tony
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to John on 15:25 Oct-08-2012 .

John, after the last few jobs ive been on most notably the last it is some of the major companies giving NDT a bad name by effectively ripping off the client offering services that aren't needed and doing them without the correct tools for the job (just small things like no procedure and equipment with expired calibration).

Whilst there are very knowledgeable people in NDT such as folk on this website who seemingly have integrity in what they are doing and have studied with interest in their chosen field, a significant section in positions of power are more often then not just chancers with the gift of the gab.

But like i say if this guy wants a stable career one as an Electrician has more foundation then one in NDT, i presume that sparkys make a better living then most offshore!

 
 
20:55 Oct-08-2012

John M. Champion
Other, UT/AUT Scanner Technician,
International Union of Operating Engineers; (NDT) Local #112 ,
USA,
Joined Apr 2009
15
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to John on 17:57 Oct-08-2012 .

Hello John...It would seem that my comments went straight past you. For one, I was NOT "attacking" your "opinion", I simply made a comment that I thought as NDT professionals that our ethics should dictate our response. A person need not "take us by the hand" and tell us, this is their "opinion"...As professionals in the "know" so to speak, I would think it was obvious it was an opinion and not based on fact. Also I ended my comment with the closure, "Most respectfully" desiring that it not be viewed as an attack, but simply as from one "colleague to another" type of statement. Forgive me if you took it as negative criticism. I meant no disrespect.

 
 
21:39 Oct-08-2012
Amy
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to david summerson on 21:43 Oct-07-2012 (Opening).

David,
Having a sound knowledge of electrical theory will only help in Eddy Current training. Classroom training is normally offered in 40 hour classes beginning with Level I. To acquire certification in the NDT field in your method of choice you will need a certain number of classroom hours and documented on the job training. This varies depending what your employer requires certification to, for example, NAS 410 require 40 formal classroom hours for Level I with 400 OJT hours and an additional 40 classroom (80 total) and 1200 OJT for Level II (1600 total).

Free online course material is available at the link below and may better help judge your base knowledge on which course would be more suitable, but in the long run you still need the documented time and training.

Good Luck,
Amy
http://www.ndt-ed.org/EducationResources/CommunityCollege/EddyCurrents/cc_ec_index.htm

 
 
00:02 Oct-09-2012

John
NDT Inspector, pipeline, ASME, AWS,
USA,
Joined Sep 2009
213
Re: starting out in NDT
In Reply to david summerson on 21:43 Oct-07-2012 (Opening).

David, sorry about the side track that this thread took. Going the ET direction in this biz seams like a very logical choice with an electrical background. I think that Amy gives very sound and accurate advice. Good luck to you in your studies, if you go the aerospace route, you will will probably find that UT and resonance testing won't be far behind and will use a lot of complementary knowledge. With that, your "semi" skills should take you far, good luck and good studies.

 
 
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