NDTnet - March 1996, Vol.1 No.03

Rationale and Summary of Methods for Determining Ultrasonic Properties of Materials
at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

by Albert E. Brown, February 9, 1995

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ABSTRACT

This report is a summary of the methods used to determine ultrasonic velocities through the many materials tested at the Acoustic Properties of Materials Laboratory. Ultrasonic velocity techniques enable us to determine material properties, including elastic moduli, without harming the materials being tested, an advantage some over mechanical methods. Ultrasonic modulus determination has other advantages as well:

1.) relative ease and low cost of material preparation, and,

2.) comparative analysis to physical testing as a function of material loading rate dependence.

In addition, ultrasonic measurement provides clues to determine grain size and orientation, and provides a relative indication of material anisotropy with respect to the material geometry. We usually perform ultrasonic measurements on materials in ambient atmospheric conditions, and in a relatively free-free condition. However, we can perform them in other environments, as required. This paper describes some of our techniques and shows how ultrasonic velocities are used to establish elastic constants. It also includes a sample test report for a homogeneous isotropic solid, along with a list of references.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

Introduction
Table of Symbols

  • Determining Ultrasonic Velocity

    CHAPTER II

  • RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ULTRASONIC VELOCITY AND ELASTIC MODULI

  • WHAT ELSE? A LOOK AT SOME OTHER TECHNIQUES

  • CONCLUSIONS

  • REFERENCES

  • Appendix A

  • Appendix B

  • Appendix C


    DISCLAIMER

    This is an informal report intended primarily for internal or limited external distribution. The opinions and conclusions stated are those of the author and may or may not be those of the Laboratory. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

    This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or the University of California. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or the University of California, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes.

    This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy.

    Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Prices available from (615) 576-8401, FTS 626-8401

    Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161


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    Rolf Diederichs 22.Nov.1995, info@ndt.net

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