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- since 1996 -

YXLON Copenhagen
YXLON Copenhagen is a highly specialized, award winning Danish company with 60 years of experience in portable X-ray solutions for industrial NDT.
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Technical Discussions
novice
novice
03:56 Apr-30-2008
shear wave test frequency and probe angle

How can I calculate the test frequency and probe angle to be used before preforming a shear wave examination?


 
 Reply 
 
Gowri Santhosh Palika
Gowri Santhosh Palika
03:36 May-01-2008
Re: shear wave test frequency and probe angle
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: How can I calculate the test frequency and probe angle to be used before preforming a shear wave examination?
------------ End Original Message ------------

Calculation of probe angle
It is depend on the thickness of job and weld geometry. There is a formula to get probe angle according to thickness ''Probe angle = 90 - T''. Here T is thickness of job. There is an another formula according to weld geometry is '' Probe angle = 90-®/2''. Here ®(tita) = groove angle. this formula is used when the job thickness is high and if therf is any necessity.
Probe frequency
It is depend on the type of job, job material, sensitivity requirements and thickness of job. There is no any formulas to calculate the probe frequency.


 
 Reply 
 
Michel Couture
NDT Inspector,
consultant, Canada, Joined Sep 2006, 889

Michel Couture

NDT Inspector,
consultant,
Canada,
Joined Sep 2006
889
00:13 May-01-2008
Re: shear wave test frequency and probe angle
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : How can I calculate the test frequency and probe angle to be used before preforming a shear wave examination?
: Calculation of probe angle
: It is depend on the thickness of job and weld geometry. There is a formula to get probe angle according to thickness ''Probe angle = 90 - T''. Here T is thickness of job. There is an another formula according to weld geometry is '' Probe angle = 90-®/2''. Here ®(tita) = groove angle. this formula is used when the job thickness is high and if therf is any necessity.
: Probe frequency
: It is depend on the type of job, job material, sensitivity requirements and thickness of job. There is no any formulas to calculate the probe frequency.
------------ End Original Message ------------

Hi,

I totally agree, but would like to ad to that. In regards to weld inspection, very often, you don't have a choice in the frequency and probe angle. They are dictated by code. But has Gowri said, it depends on thickness and part geometry.

Secondly, to help you a little more, as a rule of thumb my buddies and I are using the following guidelines: Less than 6 inches (12 mm) we use a 5 MHz. Greater than 6 we use 2.25 MHz. The other rules of thumb we go by is if the art is greater than 3 inches (6 mm) in thickness we use a 1 inch (25 mm) diameter probe.

Hope this is helping

Michel




 
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