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Technical Discussions
David Harvey
Engineering
ATI - Wah Chang, USA, Joined Nov 2002, 42

David Harvey

Engineering
ATI - Wah Chang,
USA,
Joined Nov 2002
42
02:46 Jan-20-2009
Interpretation in NAS-410 re Cert Expiration

I am trying to implement NAS410, Revision 2. One of the many interesting new features of this document is the interpretation of qualification expiration - that a certification is considered to expire at the end of the month corresponding to the beginning of the certification period. For example, if an individual was certified as a Level II on April 8, 2000, then the expiration would be April 30, 2003 (using a 3-yr period).
Has anyone been using this interpretation before NAS-410 Revision 2 arrived? If so, what industry are you working in, and what have your Customers said? This small allowance has some benefits, I think, and the resulting imprecision of the expiration period is not going to have any real bearing on the actual abilities of the inspector. Your feedback is appreciated!


 
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B Din
Malaysia, Joined Jan 2009, 4

B Din

Malaysia,
Joined Jan 2009
4
02:52 Jan-20-2009
Re: Interpretation in NAS-410 re Cert Expiration
In Reply to David Harvey at 02:46 Jan-20-2009 (Opening).

Hi David,
I believe you must be now working to NAS410 Rev. 3 as the issue has been released March last year.
I personally believe your interpretation is correct, and if I'm not mistaken the same approach implemented by ASNT to their certificates (validity period by month). However, to be on the safe side, I would stick to the date-to-date/ day basis.
The standard is the outline of the minimum requirement. We're okay to exceed the minimum requirement in that circumstance.

 
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