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Technical Discussions
vicor
personal, Canada, Joined Mar 2019, 3

vicor

personal,
Canada,
Joined Mar 2019
3
05:33 Mar-13-2019
TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT

anyone has experience about TFM device to guide me? Which mode is useful for detecting the flaws in the weld joints?
Generally, we have different wave modes :
• Direct (LL or TT)
• Corner (LLL or TTT)
• Indirect (LLLL or TTTT)

but for example for porosity, crack, lof, lop and so on .which one is better?
Also, anyone has the procedure to inspect the weld joint with TFM? ( please share with me )
Finally, how can I improve my knowledge about TFM INSPECTION, because I did not find any book or standard about that?

    
 
 
Patrick Tremblay
Sales, -
Zetec, Canada, Joined Nov 2010, 25

Patrick Tremblay

Sales, -
Zetec,
Canada,
Joined Nov 2010
25
15:33 Mar-13-2019
Re: TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT
In Reply to vicor at 05:33 Mar-13-2019 (Opening).

Hi Victor,

Even though it may seem complicated, TFM is still UT. For the detection of the types of weld defects listed in your post, you should use the same basic principles with TFM as for PA UT and conventional UT (i.e. to detect a LoF from the near side, bouncing SW off the backwall is going to give you the best results, so T-T). This being said, depending on the thickness of the weld and the frequency of your probe, you should pay a close attention to the number of points in your TFM frame in order not to undersample your data.

If you would like to improve your knowledge about the physics principles behind TFM, I suggest you to have a look at the recording of the webinar that Zetec has done on this topic in December 2018 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWz9YavSY5M). Otherwise, if you send me an email, I can send you some more literature.

1    
 
 
Vahhid
NDT Inspector,
Iran, Joined Dec 2015, 11

Vahhid

NDT Inspector,
Iran,
Joined Dec 2015
11
19:05 Mar-13-2019
Re: TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT
In Reply to Patrick Tremblay at 15:33 Mar-13-2019 .

Hi dear , please share with me TFM literature

    
 
 
Edward Ginzel
R & D, -
Materials Research Institute, Canada, Joined Nov 1998, 1236

Edward Ginzel

R & D, -
Materials Research Institute,
Canada,
Joined Nov 1998
1236
19:56 Mar-13-2019
Re: TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT
In Reply to Vahhid at 19:05 Mar-13-2019 .

Vahhid, in the post on this thread just prior to your question, Patrick Tremblay provided you an excellent resource on the topic.
On a parallel thread on NDT.net (https://www.ndt.net/forum/thread.php?admin=&forenID=0&msgID=74319&rootID=74307#74319) there was discussion on the topic as well. J.B noted there are MANY papers on NDT.net that you need only search on the NDT.net search engine.
But perhaps people have missed an excellent remark by Amnol Birring on that same thread...
He advised to read about SAFT (synthetic aperture focussing technique). The acronyms TFM/FMC/IWEX/SPA seem to be attempts by the NDT industry to re-invent the SAFT process as their own. In fact the idea in ultrasonic imaging goes back to 1972 (C. B. Burckhardt, P.A. Grandchamp, and H. Hoffmann, "An Experimental 2Mhz Synthetic Aperture Sonar System Intended for Medical Use," IEEE Transactions on Sonics and Ultrasonics, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-6, 1974).

    
 
 
victor
personal, Canada, Joined Mar 2019, 3

victor

personal,
Canada,
Joined Mar 2019
3
22:46 Mar-13-2019
Re: TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT
In Reply to Patrick Tremblay at 15:33 Mar-13-2019 .

watts.victor1986@gmail.com

Could you please share the literature about TFM and also I read some document and I am confused about something.
I appreciate in short sentences explain that for me, what is the difference between a Phased array, VTFM, TFM and DDF including advantages and disadvantages on the weld joints?
Also, what is the difference these methods with respect to resolution, sensitivity, focusing, sizing and detection? (which technique is better for which one).

    
 
 
Patrick Tremblay
Sales, -
Zetec, Canada, Joined Nov 2010, 25

Patrick Tremblay

Sales, -
Zetec,
Canada,
Joined Nov 2010
25
16:41 Mar-14-2019
Re: TFM MODE SELECTION FOR DETECT DEFECT
In Reply to victor at 22:46 Mar-13-2019 .

Victor, I just sent you some documentation by email. I hope you will find it interesting.

For anyone interested in the underlying physics of FMC/TFM, in addition to the webinar mentioned in my previous post and the many articles available on ndt.net (thanks for the references Mr. Ginzel!), a white paper can be downloaded from Zetec's website: https://www.zetec.com/advanced-focusing-techniques/

    
 
 

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