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Michael J Chapman
Student, NDT of Timber
University of Ulster @ Jordanstown, Ireland, Joined Nov 1998, 1

Michael J Chapman

Student, NDT of Timber
University of Ulster @ Jordanstown,
Ireland,
Joined Nov 1998
1
05:38 Dec-14-1999
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES

Hi John,

With reference to your request for information on testing utility poles.
During my own research into NDT of timber I came across a device called the
"PURL" tester used by my local electricity service for testing utility
poles.  Since it was not suitable for my own testing the following
information is somewhat brief.  It is designed specifically for testing
utility poles for internal rot / decay and I suspect a better choice than
the Sylvatest which I understand to be a more general purpose instrument.
The device is powered by its own batteries and comprises a transmitter which
is screwed into the pole (see attached photo) and a receiver which is then
moved to points around the pole, also seen in photo.  A LED indicates if the
transmitted signal was received or not.  The data is entered into a computer
programme by crossing boxes for either a "signal received" OR a "signal not
received".  When all the data is entered the programme plots an outline of
the poleindicating any corresponding rot or decay (see figure showing
outline of four poles).

It was a couple of years ago that I saw the PURL tester and I am trying to
get you information regarding the manufacturer etc.  I will send this on as
soon as I am able to get it.

Hope this information is of some use.

Best wishes,

Michael J Chapman.


 
 Reply 
 
Rod Martin
Sales,
NDT Equipment Sales Pty Limited, Australia, Joined Oct 1999, 10

Rod Martin

Sales,
NDT Equipment Sales Pty Limited,
Australia,
Joined Oct 1999
10
05:20 Dec-15-1999
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES

: Hi John,

: With reference to your request for information on testing utility poles.
: During my own research into NDT of timber I came across a device called the
: "PURL" tester used by my local electricity service for testing utility
: poles.  Since it was not suitable for my own testing the following
: information is somewhat brief.  It is designed specifically for testing
: utility poles for internal rot / decay and I suspect a better choice than
: the Sylvatest which I understand to be a more general purpose instrument.
: The device is powered by its own batteries and comprises a transmitter which
: is screwed into the pole (see attached photo) and a receiver which is then
: moved to points around the pole, also seen in photo.  A LED indicates if the
: transmitted signal was received or not.  The data is entered into a computer
: programme by crossing boxes for either a "signal received" OR a "signal not
: received".  When all the data is entered the programmeplots an outline of
: the pole indicating any corresponding rot or decay (see figure showing
: outline of four poles).

: It was a couple of years ago that I saw the PURL tester and I am trying to
: get you information regarding the manufacturer etc.  I will send this on as
: soon as I am able to get it.

: Hope this information is of some use.

: Best wishes,

: Michael J Chapman.




 
 Reply 
 
Rod Martin
Sales,
NDT Equipment Sales Pty Limited, Australia, Joined Oct 1999, 10

Rod Martin

Sales,
NDT Equipment Sales Pty Limited,
Australia,
Joined Oct 1999
10
05:26 Dec-15-1999
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES
The New South Wazles Electricity Association conducted an investigation into methods of inspection for Wooden Power Poles. During this test I was able to observe the complete range of equipment.

The Ultrasonic Testing in my opinion was not easy to interpret (A university degree in crystal ball gazing would help). The most understandable results came from x-ray or gamma density meters that either gave an image or a series of readings that could be understood. Since these tests, a new product has emerged on the market. This unit is called the "Profiler" using an isotope and the latest electronics. This unit can provide a real-time graph on a laptop which is downloaded onto a disc for immediate record. Scan speeds along the pole can be up to 20"/second and this is done twice, once along the king line and then 90 degrees to the king line. The Profiler can then transverse the pole for main points of interest.

I believe in the future, Australia will use this unit on its large range of hardwood poles and bridges.

Merry Christmas

Rod Martin
: Hi John,

: With reference to your request for information on testing utility poles.
: During my own research into NDT of timber I came across a device called the
: "PURL" tester used by my local electricity service for testing utility
: poles.  Since it was not suitable for my own testing the following
: information is somewhat brief.  It is designed specifically for testing
: utility poles for internal rot / decay and I suspect a better choice than
: the Sylvatest which I understand to be a more general purpose instrument.
: The device is powered by its own batteries and comprises a transmitter which
: is screwed into the pole (see attached photo) and a receiver which is then
: moved to points around the pole, also seen in photo.  A LED indicates if the
: transmitted signal was received or not.  The data is entered into a computer
: programme by crossing boxes for either a "signal received" OR a "signal not
: received".  When all the data is entered the programme plots an outline of
: the pole indicating any corresponding rot or decay (see figure showing
: outline of four poles).

: It was a couple of years ago that I saw the PURL tester and I am trying to
: get you information regarding the manufacturer etc.  I will send this on as
: soon as I am able to get it.

: Hope this information is of some use.

: Best wishes,

: Michael J Chapman.




 
 Reply 
 
Geoff Bennett
Geoff Bennett
03:08 Nov-01-2001
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES
In June 2001 the NSW Electricity Association published the results of the NDE study. An ultrsound product called WoodScan developed by Foley International Limited was the only commercially available product to achieve the highest Category A rating. Subsequent to the release of this study. ERGON (Aucklands Electric Utility) has adopted WoodScan as their best practice for pole testing. Ergon, Engergex and Aurora are all currently testing the system.

G. Bennett

: The New South Wazles Electricity Association conducted an investigation into methods of inspection for Wooden Power Poles. During this test I was able to observe the complete range of equipment.

: The Ultrasonic Testing in my opinion was not easy to interpret (A university degree in crystal ball gazing would help). The most understandable results came from x-ray or gamma density meters that either gave an image or a series of readings that could be understood. Since these tests, a new product has emerged on the market. This unit is calledthe "Profiler" using an isotope and the latest electronics. This unit can provide a real-time graph on a laptop which is downloaded onto a disc for immediate record. Scan speeds along the pole can be up to 20"/second and this is done twice, once along the king line and then 90 degrees to the king line. The Profiler can then transverse the pole for main points of interest.

: I believe in the future, Australia will use this unit on its large range of hardwood poles and bridges.

: Merry Christmas

: Rod Martin
: : Hi John,

: : With reference to your request for information on testing utility poles.
: : During my own research into NDT of timber I came across a device called the
: : "PURL" tester used by my local electricity service for testing utility
: : poles.  Since it was not suitable for my own testing the following
: : information is somewhat brief.  It is designed specifically for testing
: : utility poles for internal rot / decay and I suspect a better choice than
: : the Sylvatest which I understand to be a more general purpose instrument.
: : The device is powered by its own batteries and comprises a transmitter which
: : is screwed into the pole (see attached photo) and a receiver which is then
: : moved to points around the pole, also seen in photo.  A LED indicates if the
: : transmitted signal was received or not.  The data is entered into a computer
: : programme by crossing boxes for either a "signal received" OR a "signal not
: : received".  When all the data is entered the programme plots an outline of
: : the pole indicating any corresponding rot or decay (see figure showing
: : outline of four poles).

: : It was a couple of years ago that I saw the PURL tester and I am trying to
: : get you information regarding the manufacturer etc.  I will send this on as
: : soon as I am able to get it.

: : Hope this information is of some use.

: : Best wishes,

: : Michael J Chapman.




 
 Reply 
 
Liam English
Student
EA Technology and Warwick University, United Kingdom, Joined Jan 2002, 1

Liam English

Student
EA Technology and Warwick University,
United Kingdom,
Joined Jan 2002
1
01:32 Jan-18-2002
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES
Regarding the Ultrasonic inspection of wooden utility poles, I am currently involved with a research project regarding the PURL (Pole Ultrasonic Rot Locator). It is manufactured in the UK by a company called EA Technology, and is widely used by the Electricity Boards around the country. It is capable of producing images of rot inside the pole and calculating a remaining strength percentage. It does have a few small problems which are currently being addressed, but has been shown to a reliable, very easy to use and understand unit. If you would like more information then feel free to e-mail me at liam.english@eatechnology.com, or visit the company website (www.eatechnology.com)

Regards

Liam English




 
 Reply 
 
Simon Rhodes
Simon Rhodes
18:10 Sep-17-2019
Re: ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WOODEN UTILITY POLES
In Reply to Liam English at 01:32 Jan-18-2002 .

Hi Liam. I know it’s a long shot as this email was a few years ago. wonder
if you would be able to help or put me in the right direction. I am looking for
any information on leaning wooden telegraph pole in the UK. Is there any
criteria on when they need replacing or straightening before it becomes dangerous
and a hazard. around the country there are quite a lot at a large degree leaning
Look forward to hearing from you if you could help thank you Simon,

 
 Reply 
 

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