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Technical Discussions
Jacques Parent
Jacques Parent
07:11 Dec-23-1999
Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header

I am looking for any information, paper, link or past experience on internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header.
Our company has experience of cracking in the economizer inlet header due to a corrosion-fatigue mechanism. The fatigue component resulting from thermal stresses generated by the admission of relatively cold feedwater into hot headers.
We have discovered:
-Longitudinal cracking in the tube stub
-Cracking in the tube hole running parallel to the axis of the hole
-Cracking from the internal lip of the hole toward adjacent holes in both longitudinal and circumferential directions (ligaments)

We need an inspection technique to detect and size the trough-wall depth of the cracks.

Thank you for your help
jp


 
 Reply 
 
Ed Ginzel
R & D, -
Materials Research Institute, Canada, Joined Nov 1998, 1307

Ed Ginzel

R & D, -
Materials Research Institute,
Canada,
Joined Nov 1998
1307
01:37 Dec-23-1999
Re: Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header
Jacques:
Greetings!!!

In 1983 Dr. Michael Moles and Tony Allen were in Ontario Hydro Research (which I still call it)
and published a paper on the technique they came up with for the Economiser Inlet header cracking
that existed THEN, 17 years ago.
The paper was published in Materials Evaluation May 1984/vol 42/ no.6.
I suppose the technique you develop will depend on the type of access
you have. This sounds like an interesting one.
Crack sizing using tip diffraction can be used but you will want to detect the indications first.
Moles and Allen managed to flood the header and worked with an immersion setup using tandem probes.
We need more information about the problem before a working solution can be derived.

Regards
Ed


: I am looking for any information, paper, link or past experience on internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header.
: Our company has experience of cracking in the economizer inlet header due to a corrosion-fatigue mechanism.The fatigue component resulting from thermal stresses generated by the admission of relatively cold feedwater into hot headers.
: We have discovered:
: -Longitudinal cracking in the tube stub
: -Cracking in the tube hole running parallel to the axis of the hole
: -Cracking from the internal lip of the hole toward adjacent holes in both longitudinal and circumferential directions (ligaments)

: We need an inspection technique to detect and size the trough-wall depth of the cracks.

: Thank you for your help
: jp




 
 Reply 
 
J. Mark Davis
Teacher, And Consultant
University of Ultrasonics, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, Joined Mar 2000, 85

J. Mark Davis

Teacher, And Consultant
University of Ultrasonics, Birmingham, Alabama,
USA,
Joined Mar 2000
85
07:41 Dec-24-1999
Re: Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header
Dear Jacques,

I can address some techniques for this type of inspection using Creeping Waves and Tip Diffrcation.

If you happen to have a cut out sample I can demo some very simple techniques. I do need a sketch of your design.

If you can email a copy of a drawing and I will evaluate it prior to the class in Jnauary.

Merry Christmas


: I am looking for any information, paper, link or past experience on internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header.
: Our company has experience of cracking in the economizer inlet header due to a corrosion-fatigue mechanism. The fatigue component resulting from thermal stresses generated by the admission of relatively cold feedwater into hot headers.
: We have discovered:
: -Longitudinal cracking in the tube stub
: -Cracking in the tube hole running parallel to the axis of the hole
: -Cracking from the internal lip of the hole toward adjacent holes in both longitudinal and circumferential directions (ligaments)

: We need an inspection technique to detect and size the trough-wall depth of the cracks.

: Thank you for your help
: jp




 
 Reply 
 
Buddy B. Jolley II
Buddy B. Jolley II
02:50 Dec-27-1999
Re: Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header
I am Director of Field Service and Rentals with Everest VIT, Inc. We are a company specializing in remote visual inspection products and services. I would like to discuss your need. I can be reached in Charotte, NC at 888 566-5848. I am not sure where you are located, but we have several regional locations around North America.


 
 Reply 
 
Jan Verkooijen
Director,
Sonovation, Netherlands, Joined Nov 1998, 29

Jan Verkooijen

Director,
Sonovation,
Netherlands,
Joined Nov 1998
29
09:31 Dec-28-1999
Re: Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header
: I am looking for any information, paper, link or past experience on internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header.
: Our company has experience of cracking in the economizer inlet header due to a corrosion-fatigue mechanism. The fatigue component resulting from thermal stresses generated by the admission of relatively cold feedwater into hot headers.
: We have discovered:
: -Longitudinal cracking in the tube stub
: -Cracking in the tube hole running parallel to the axis of the hole
: -Cracking from the internal lip of the hole toward adjacent holes in both longitudinal and circumferential directions (ligaments)

: We need an inspection technique to detect and size the trough-wall depth of the cracks.

: Thank you for your help
: jp

Dear sir,

We are a company specialising in inspection technology solutions, ranging from R&D, applications development and equipment
manufacture to field services applications.
We have come across a number of the problems you describe,in various forms, such as an application where in a nuclear
environment we looked at ligament cracking of the vessel head, another is in a conventional power station, where we have
inspected for cracking in the inner radius and so on.
We have a range of solutions, from very simple, yet already fairly accurate and reliable techniques but obviously with
some drawbacks, to very extensive (and sometimes expensive) combinations of various techniques leading to very reliable
inspections as proven during validations at institutes such as EPRI.
To be able to assess what inspection technique would be appropriate the situation should be assessed from drawings/sketches
and any other information available, and be put in the normal industrial constraints re available budget etc.
We have offices and collaborations around the world, and would be happy to assist you where possible in reaching a technologically
sound and cost effective solution.

Best regards,

Jan Verkooijen
AEA Sonomatic BV

NB you could visit our NDT homepage via:
http://www.aeat.co.uk/energy/prdsrv/inspect/inspect0.htm



 
 Reply 
 
Jacques Parent
Jacques Parent
00:55 Jan-05-2000
Re: Internal ligament inspection in economizer inlet header
Thank you for the comments received both through the forum and by e-mail.
So far I have heard of:
-Manual shear wave techniques from the OD using miniature probes
-Immersion set-up using tandem probes from the inside of the header (Presented by OHR some 15 years ago but never applied practically, to my knowledge)
-Tip Difraction
-TOFD
-Creeping waves
-Remote visual

I was looking (hoping) for a generic method (existing and proven) that would quickly detect and size. I think I can safely conclude that the present forum is not aware of such a method.

I am thinking of the following scheme (if my client wants to go any further):
1) Remote visual from the inside for detection and baselining
2) Spot grinding (through handholes) for depth sizing and potential correlation length/depth
3) External manual UT (shear, creeping waves and/or tip diffraction) for confirmation of depth on a sample basis

Any comments?
Regards
jp




 
 Reply 
 
mostafa
mostafa
06:40 Aug-18-2001
need information
Thank u for help
I'm a student and need any information in field of
weld testing by ut method as: deffect and finding
deffects by test and the method of testing ...



 
 Reply 
 
mostafa
mostafa
06:41 Aug-18-2001
need information
Thank u for help
I'm a student and need any information in field of
weld testing by ut method as: deffect and finding
deffects by test and the method of testing ...
pleas send me and glad me
thanku befor





 
 Reply 
 

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