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09:38 Feb-10-2008

Ahtram

Sales
Sanco,
United Arab Emirates (UAE),
Joined Jan 2008
4
Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser?

I am assuming most of you guys have used NDT metal analysers from Niton, Oxford Instruments and Innovex.

So would anyone like to share there experience with the metal analysers mentioned above?

Which one you think is the best and why?




 
05:17 Feb-11-2008

burhanudin sudharmin

Engineering, Reliability and Integrity Eng
Shell Malaysia Trading,
Malaysia,
Joined Jan 2008
54
Re: Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser? Which one is the best, is quite subjective to one's need and requirements.
Just to share, I have experience in the use of the Texas Instruments Alloy Analyser. Its however, limited to identifying alloys only. The other downside is the use of radioactive isotopes which requires replacement in about 5 years due to its half life, and maintenance upkeep could be expensive.

----------- Start Original Message -----------
: I am assuming most of you guys have used NDT metal analysers from Niton, Oxford Instruments and Innovex.
: So would anyone like to share there experience with the metal analysers mentioned above?
: Which one you think is the best and why?
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
01:22 Feb-13-2008

ahtram

Sales
Sanco,
United Arab Emirates (UAE),
Joined Jan 2008
4
Re: Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser? ----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Which one is the best, is quite subjective to one's need and requirements.
: Just to share, I have experience in the use of the Texas Instruments Alloy Analyser. Its however, limited to identifying alloys only. The other downside is the use of radioactive isotopes which requires replacement in about 5 years due to its half life, and maintenance upkeep could be expensive.
: : I am assuming most of you guys have used NDT metal analysers from Niton, Oxford Instruments and Innovex.
: : So would anyone like to share there experience with the metal analysers mentioned above?
: : Which one you think is the best and why?
------------ End Original Message ------------

hmmm thanks burhanudin. Yes I agree with you there is a downside to the use of radioactive isptopes where it requies a replacement. Also I do believe radioactive isotopes happen to be dangerous to humans if humans are exposed to them. Radioactive source is old technology banned in USA and europe. its a shame that companies like Niton sell radioactive source metal analysers in the Middle East where there are no legislations against radioactive source. Maybe in the future there will be.




 
04:29 Feb-17-2008
mj
Re: Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser? ----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : Which one is the best, is quite subjective to one's need and requirements.
: : Just to share, I have experience in the use of the Texas Instruments Alloy Analyser. Its however, limited to identifying alloys only. The other downside is the use of radioactive isotopes which requires replacement in about 5 years due to its half life, and maintenance upkeep could be expensive.
: : : I am assuming most of you guys have used NDT metal analysers from Niton, Oxford Instruments and Innovex.
: : : So would anyone like to share there experience with the metal analysers mentioned above?
: : : Which one you think is the best and why?
: hmmm thanks burhanudin. Yes I agree with you there is a downside to the use of radioactive isptopes where it requies a replacement. Also I do believe radioactive isotopes happen to be dangerous to humans if humans are exposed to them. Radioactive source is old technology banned in USA and europe. its a shame that companies like Niton sell radioactive source metal analysers in the Middle East where there are no legislations against radioactive source. Maybe in the future there will be.
------------ End Original Message ------------

if some one don't know about the radiation problems better plz don't talk.... if compare with industrial radiograpy, its very very low... so its not the matter of radiation, its the matter of refilling and limitation of indentification, mean time oxford provide some good equipment with argon to find even carbon and ph., looks nice but the problem there also.... i have 2 oxford equipment. which will brakedown every 6 months or 7 months... to get equipment after repair manufacture usualy take 3-4 months... but quipmentwise ARCMet 930 ( old Mechine0 is good
Thanks


 
04:51 Mar-14-2008
jason
Re: Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser? ----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : : Which one is the best, is quite subjective to one's need and requirements.
: : : Just to share, I have experience in the use of the Texas Instruments Alloy Analyser. Its however, limited to identifying alloys only. The other downside is the use of radioactive isotopes which requires replacement in about 5 years due to its half life, and maintenance upkeep could be expensive.
: : : : I am assuming most of you guys have used NDT metal analysers from Niton, Oxford Instruments and Innovex.
: : : : So would anyone like to share there experience with the metal analysers mentioned above?
: : : : Which one you think is the best and why?
: : hmmm thanks burhanudin. Yes I agree with you there is a downside to the use of radioactive isptopes where it requies a replacement. Also I do believe radioactive isotopes happen to be dangerous to humans if humans are exposed to them. Radioactive source is old technology banned in USA and europe. its a shame that companies like Niton sell radioactive source metal analysers in the Middle East where there are no legislations against radioactive source. Maybe in the future there will be.
: if some one don't know about the radiation problems better plz don't talk.... if compare with industrial radiograpy, its very very low... so its not the matter of radiation, its the matter of refilling and limitation of indentification, mean time oxford provide some good equipment with argon to find even carbon and ph., looks nice but the problem there also.... i have 2 oxford equipment. which will brakedown every 6 months or 7 months... to get equipment after repair manufacture usualy take 3-4 months... but quipmentwise ARCMet 930 ( old Mechine0 is good
: Thanks
------------ End Original Message ------------

I used the dual source Nitons for NACE MR0175 certification and weld/parent mat"l alloy composition and was very impressed. Compared to the competition they are small, lightweight and fast. I used them in Alberta, Canada and they performed well in extreme conditions. I would recommend them for field work. I'm not sure if they would be the right tool for a lab environment since I try to stay
out of the lab rat zone.

Cheers



 
16:04 Mar-11-2009
Aage
Re: Which one is the best NDT/PMI metal analyser? In Reply to jason at 04:51 Mar-14-2008 .

Just a follow up on isotope vs. X-ray tube. Isotopes currently being used have much longer lifetime than those used some years ago. They are now described as "everlasting" having half-life of about 100 years. The Niton XLp818 would be an example of such model.
X-ray tube is more accurate and faster than isotope.
X-ray tube models may be easier to transport (e.g. on planes) than isotope models. The rules for this vary from country to country, also within Europe. I believe some countries do not allow the use of isotopes (e.g. Spain). However, I live in Norway and consider buying an isotope based model due to lifetime and that I will only use it on high alloyed steels, and thus I do not need the increased accuracy of the X-ray tube.

 


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