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- since 1996 -

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Technical Discussions
Jim Stuckless
Jim Stuckless
02:40 Dec-23-2008
PT dwell time variations in reference to temperature extremes

Does anybody have....... or know where i can find.... a table outlining penetrant and developer dwell times with regards to temperature? I know certain codes and standards provide guidelines but I'm looking for something less vague.


    
 
 
S.V.Swamy
Engineering, - Material Testing Inspection & Quality Control
Retired from Nuclear Fuel Complex , India, Joined Feb 2001, 785

S.V.Swamy

Engineering, - Material Testing Inspection & Quality Control
Retired from Nuclear Fuel Complex ,
India,
Joined Feb 2001
785
00:50 Dec-27-2008
Re: PT dwell time variations in reference to temperature extremes
What is vague about them? And the manufacturers provide enough literature, if needed. If the temperature is too low, viscosity will be too high and penetration will not take place properly. If the temperature is too high, the penetrant will dry out and will again not penetrate. If in doubt, use test coupons at the same temperature and see whether you are able to pick up the needed indications.

Swamy
NDT Guru
Hyderabad, India

----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Does anybody have....... or know where i can find.... a table outlining penetrant and developer dwell times with regards to temperature? I know certain codes and standards provide guidelines but I'm looking for something less vague.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 
Michel Couture
NDT Inspector,
consultant, Canada, Joined Sep 2006, 825

Michel Couture

NDT Inspector,
consultant,
Canada,
Joined Sep 2006
825
09:59 Dec-27-2008
Re: PT dwell time variations in reference to temperature extremes
Hi Jim,

I totally agree with Swamy. Even more I do remember 20 years ago when I got into NDT and dealing mostly with Military Standard that we (in the Canadian Air Force) used MIL-I-6868 to select the penetrant and developer that was compatible with the job we had to do. I do know if it still exist today or if it has been superseded by another code. But, in the end, if you consult the manufacturer's spec. for a product and stay within the temperature range of the code your working to, you shouldn't have any problem. Remember keep it simple and don't try to reinvent the wheel. Many people have spent countless hours to come up with with is already establish and it work.

Cheerio's

Michel

----------- Start Original Message -----------
: What is vague about them? And the manufacturers provide enough literature, if needed. If the temperature is too low, viscosity will be too high and penetration will not take place properly. If the temperature is too high, the penetrant will dry out and will againnot penetrate. If in doubt, use test coupons at the same temperature and see whether you are able to pick up the needed indications.
: Swamy
: NDT Guru
: Hyderabad, India
: : Does anybody have....... or know where i can find.... a table outlining penetrant and developer dwell times with regards to temperature? I know certain codes and standards provide guidelines but I'm looking for something less vague.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 
Justin Lehmann
Consultant,
Quality Testing Services, Inc, A Premium Inspection and Testing Group Affiliate, USA, Joined Sep 2007, 22

Justin Lehmann

Consultant,
Quality Testing Services, Inc, A Premium Inspection and Testing Group Affiliate,
USA,
Joined Sep 2007
22
03:31 Jan-06-2009
Re: PT dwell time variations in reference to temperature extremes
Jim,

Take a look at ASTM E-1417. It states "The component,
penetrant, and ambient temperatures shall all be in the range from 40 to 125°F [4 to 52°C] unless otherwise specified." It goes on, "The dwell time, unless otherwise specified, shall be a minimum of 10 min. For temperatures between 40 and 50°F [4.4 and 10°C], dwell time shall be a minimum of 20 min."
The ASTM does not address temperatures outside of these ranges.

Justin Lehmann
Manager - Training and Consulting Services
Quality Testing Services, Inc
2305 Millpark Dr
St. Louis, MO 63043
314-770-0607
314-770-0103 fax
314-575-7485 cell
jcl@qualitytesting.net

----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Hi Jim,
: I totally agree with Swamy. Even more I do remember 20 years ago when I got into NDT and dealing mostly with Military Standard that we (in the Canadian Air Force) used MIL-I-6868 to select the penetrant and developer that was compatible with the job we had to do. I do know if it still exist today or if it has been superseded by another code. But, in the end, if you consult the manufacturer's spec. for a product and stay within the temperature range of the code your working to, you shouldn't have any problem. Remember keep it simple and don't try to reinvent the wheel. Many people have spent countless hours to come up with with is already establish and it work.
: Cheerio's
: Michel
: : What is vague about them? And the manufacturers provide enough literature, if needed. If the temperature is too low, viscosity will be too high and penetration will not take place properly. If the temperature is too high, the penetrant will dry out and will again not penetrate. If in doubt, use test coupons at the same temperature and see whether you are able to pick up the needed indications.
: : Swamy
: : NDT Guru
: : Hyderabad, India
: : : Does anybody have....... or know where i can find.... a table outlining penetrant and developer dwell times with regards to temperature? I know certaincodes and standards provide guidelines but I'm looking for something less vague.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 

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