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- since 1996 -

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Career Discussions
Mike Trinidad
Consultant,
LMATS Pty Ltd , Australia, Joined Jan 2003, 138

Mike Trinidad

Consultant,
LMATS Pty Ltd ,
Australia,
Joined Jan 2003
138
03:09 Jan-13-2003
Site Radiography

Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razor wire would have stopped them.

I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.

An excuse that I have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.

Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?

I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.

Kind Regards


Mike Trinidad


    
 
 Reply 
 
Kåre Johansson
Kåre Johansson
08:22 Jan-13-2003
Re: Site Radiography
I am afraid you are not alone with this problem.

As far as tape colour is concerned: it doesn't matter what colour you use. Our warning colour is red and white, with the radiation warning being yellow and black. People still cross both.

The only thing I know which had an effect was calling the person in for a health check and spreading the rumor we were concerned (we wern't as we had done a calculation of the radiation dose).

The worst excuse I have heard was one who commented "It doesn't apply to me, I work for.....".

If anyone can come up with an easy way to stop this I would be most happy.
Kåre

Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razor wire would have stopped them.
.
: I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.
.
: An excuse thatI have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.
.
: Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?
.
: I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.
.
: Kind Regards
.
:
: Mike Trinidad
.



    
 
 Reply 
 
Pat Garland
Consultant,
P J Garland & Associates, South Africa, Joined Jun 2000, 5

Pat Garland

Consultant,
P J Garland & Associates,
South Africa,
Joined Jun 2000
5
09:03 Jan-13-2003
Re: Site Radiography
: I am afraid you are not alone with this problem.
.
: As far as tape colour is concerned: it doesn't matter what colour you use. Our warning colour is red and white, with the radiation warning being yellow and black. People still cross both.
.
: The only thing I know which had an effect was calling the person in for a health check and spreading the rumor we were concerned (we wern't as we had done a calculation of the radiation dose).
.
: The worst excuse I have heard was one who commented "It doesn't apply to me, I work for.....".
.
: If anyone can come up with an easy way to stop this I would be most happy.
: Kåre
.
: Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razor wire would have stopped them.
: .
: : I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.
: .
: : An excuse that I have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.
: .
: : Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?
: .
: : I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.
: .
: : Kind Regards
: .
: :
: : Mike Trinidad
: .
.
This seems to be a common problem.
The radiographer is responsinle to ensure that all unauthorised personnell have been evacuated from the area and to ensure that No unauthorised persons enter the area. If he cannot see all the boundries he must post additional 'barrier guards' to take care of the problem.
The colour and design of the radiation warning signs is an international standard, so it all comesback to the training.
All persons working on any site where radiography is to take place must undergo radiation awarensee and safety training.
Radiographers learn about safe distances.
How many have calculated what radiation dose will be received 15mm from a 30 curie Ir 192 source. A lethal dose will be received in less thal 60 seconds.

Best regards,

Pat Garland


    
 
 Reply 
 
Dave Davies
Dave Davies
00:16 Jan-13-2003
Re: Site Radiography
Very true, I once had the "do you know who I am" from a site manager. When we threatened to pack up and leave his nights work incomplete (and to put an official report to his head office and the HSE) he made himself scarce. The HSE doesn't unfortunately have the same teeth as the UK in all countries so this won't always work.
There is really no way to stop stupidity, these are the same people who touch a cable to see if it's live, or poke their heads into shotblast booths to see what's going on. Some of them truly are looking to gain a Darwin award.
It's not only Radiation that they disregard, watch them walk under suspended loads for instance.
These idiots are one reason we have to monitor the perimeter during exposure. Sadly, short of taking a shotgun to site there's not much we can do but remain vigilant, as you say they go to extreme lengths to place themselves in danger.
For long term site work an education program may work, or maybe the pennants should be replaced with pictures of Chernobyl and radiation burn victims.


I am afraid you are not alone with this problem.
: .
: : As far as tape colour is concerned: it doesn't matter what colour you use. Our warning colour is red and white, with the radiation warning being yellow and black. People still cross both.
: .
: : The only thing I know which had an effect was calling the person in for a health check and spreading the rumor we were concerned (we wern't as we had done a calculation of the radiation dose).
: .
: : The worst excuse I have heard was one who commented "It doesn't apply to me, I work for.....".
: .
: : If anyone can come up with an easy way to stop this I would be most happy.
: : Kåre
: .
: : Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razor wire would have stopped them.
: : .
: : : I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.
: : .
: : : An excuse that I have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.
: : .
: : : Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?
: : .
: : : I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.
: : .
: : : Kind Regards
: : .
: : :
: : : Mike Trinidad
: : .
: .
: This seems to be a common problem.
: The radiographer is responsinle to ensure that all unauthorised personnell have been evacuated from the area and to ensure that No unauthorised persons enter the area. If he cannot see all the boundries he must post additional 'barrier guards' to take care of the problem.
: The colour and design of the radiation warning signs is an international standard, so it all comes back to the training.
: All persons working on any site where radiography is to take place must undergo radiation awarensee and safety training.
: Radiographers learn about safe distances.
: How many have calculated what radiation dose will be received 15mm from a 30 curie Ir 192 source. A lethal dose will be received in less thal 60 seconds.
.
: Best regards,
.
: Pat Garland
.



    
 
 Reply 
 
Mike Trinidad
Consultant,
LMATS Pty Ltd , Australia, Joined Jan 2003, 138

Mike Trinidad

Consultant,
LMATS Pty Ltd ,
Australia,
Joined Jan 2003
138
07:23 Jan-13-2003
Re: Site Radiography
I also have had the "do you know who I am" working at a particular site where the fulltime employees considered all contractors to be scum.

At one location I had taped up the only entrance with radiation tape like something out of a Hollywood cop movie and when the guy strolls in to the middle of the shot I said what happened to the barrier tape at the access. The guy replied that it took him ages to pull it all off so he could get in!

Another time with a single access gangway I had placed our "warning, keep out radiation sign which completely blocked the walkway. It was amazing to see the contortions that two guys did to get over the sign.

The only time the situation turned out to be funny was whilst on a military base the NDT department had these little R2D2 lookalike trolleys with red flashing lights and warning signs. One night three guys after a long night at the pub decided to borrow one whilst the shot was running. Fortunately they were observed and the MP came down. When asked what shouldbe done with them the NDT NCO recommended they go straight to the base hospital for observation and blood tests. The three guys got sober real quick.

Thanks all for the input. I was thinking of putting together some sort of safety paper.

Kindest Regards


Mike Trinidad

: Very true, I once had the "do you know who I am" from a site manager. When we threatened to pack up and leave his nights work incomplete (and to put an official report to his head office and the HSE) he made himself scarce. The HSE doesn't unfortunately have the same teeth as the UK in all countries so this won't always work.
: There is really no way to stop stupidity, these are the same people who touch a cable to see if it's live, or poke their heads into shotblast booths to see what's going on. Some of them truly are looking to gain a Darwin award.
: It's not only Radiation that they disregard, watch them walk under suspended loads for instance.
: These idiots are one reason we have to monitor the perimeter duringexposure. Sadly, short of taking a shotgun to site there's not much we can do but remain vigilant, as you say they go to extreme lengths to place themselves in danger.
: For long term site work an education program may work, or maybe the pennants should be replaced with pictures of Chernobyl and radiation burn victims.
.
:
.
:
: I am afraid you are not alone with this problem.
: : .
: : : As far as tape colour is concerned: it doesn't matter what colour you use. Our warning colour is red and white, with the radiation warning being yellow and black. People still cross both.
: : .
: : : The only thing I know which had an effect was calling the person in for a health check and spreading the rumor we were concerned (we wern't as we had done a calculation of the radiation dose).
: : .
: : : The worst excuse I have heard was one who commented "It doesn't apply to me, I work for.....".
: : .
: : : If anyone can come up with an easy way to stop this I would be most happy.
: : : Kåre
: : .
: : : Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razor wire would have stopped them.
: : : .
: : : : I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.
: : : .
: : : : An excuse that I have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.
: : : .
: : : : Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?
: : : .
: : : : I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.
: : : .
: : : : Kind Regards
: : : .
: : : :
: : : : Mike Trinidad
: : : .
: : .
: : This seems to be a common problem.
: : The radiographer is responsinle to ensure that all unauthorised personnell have been evacuated from the area and to ensure that No unauthorised persons enter the area. If he cannot see all the boundries he must post additional 'barrier guards' to take care of the problem.
: : The colour and design of the radiation warning signs is an international standard, so it all comes back to the training.
: : All persons working on any site where radiography is to take place must undergo radiation awarensee and safety training.
: : Radiographers learn about safe distances.
: : How many have calculated what radiation dose will be received 15mm from a 30 curie Ir 192 source. A lethal dose will be received in less thal 60 seconds.
: .
: : Best regards,
: .
: : Pat Garland
: .
.



    
 
 Reply 
 
alison braybrook
alison braybrook
02:01 Mar-28-2003
Re: Site Radiography
what are the procedures to ensure safety of patients and the operator of a MRI or CT scan???


: : I am afraid you are not alone with this problem.
: .
: : As far as tape colour is concerned: it doesn't matter what colour you use. Our warning colour is red and white, with the radiation warning being yellow and black. People still cross both.
: .
: : The only thing I know which had an effect was calling the person in for a health check and spreading the rumor we were concerned (we wern't as we had done a calculation of the radiation dose).
: .
: : The worst excuse I have heard was one who commented "It doesn't apply to me, I work for.....".
: .
: : If anyone can come up with an easy way to stop this I would be most happy.
: : Kåre
: .
: : Many times when I have been involved in site radiography I have had people cross the erected barriers. In some instances the persons involved went to great lengths to get around or over and it it is doubtful if even electrified razorwire would have stopped them.
: : .
: : : I have also heard similar tales recounted by fellow radiographers whilst partaking of a beer or two.
: : .
: : : An excuse that I have been given on several occaisions is that the yellow and black radiation tape is very similar to caution tape and people on worksites tend to downplay caution tape.
: : .
: : : Obviously you can put more signs, flashing lights and bells but wouldn't it be easier if the radiation barrier tape was red and white denoting danger not caution?
: : .
: : : I am curious to hear of other peoples experiences with barrier jumpers and what they think the common denominator is.
: : .
: : : Kind Regards
: : .
: : :
: : : Mike Trinidad
: : .
: .
: This seems to be a common problem.
: The radiographer is responsinle to ensure that all unauthorised personnell have been evacuated from the area and to ensure that No unauthorised persons enter the area. If he cannot see all the boundries he must post additional 'barrier guards' to take care of the problem.
: The colour and design of the radiation warning signs is an international standard, so it all comes back to the training.
: All persons working on any site where radiography is to take place must undergo radiation awarensee and safety training.
: Radiographers learn about safe distances.
: How many have calculated what radiation dose will be received 15mm from a 30 curie Ir 192 source. A lethal dose will be received in less thal 60 seconds.
.
: Best regards,
.
: Pat Garland
.



    
 
 Reply 
 
LERATO
LERATO
00:09 May-01-2003
Re: Site Radiography
Pls e-mail me the application of radiography, advantages and disadvantages.


    
 
 Reply 
 
Iftikhar
Iftikhar
03:44 May-18-2003
Radiography Material
I am sending a lot of material for you t oconsult on Radiography


    
 
 Reply 
 
G.S.SRIDHAR
G.S.SRIDHAR
04:43 Apr-09-2004
Re: Radiography Material
: I am sending a lot of material for you t oconsult on Radiography
.
I am interested about radiography. and i want to collect information about radiography



    
 
 Reply 
 
Maloma M
Maloma M
09:05 Nov-26-2004
Re: Radiography Material
Please mail me information on Radiographic Material Contracts.




    
 
 Reply 
 

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