where expertise comes together - since 1996 -

The Largest Open Access Portal of Nondestructive Testing (NDT)

Conference Proceedings, Articles, News, Exhibition, Forum, Network and more

where expertise comes together
- since 1996 -

1937 views
Technical Discussions
Dave Ronson
Dave Ronson
05:35 Mar-12-2001
Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection

I am looking for a method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc.


    
 
 
Dave Wilkes
Dave Wilkes
08:16 Mar-15-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
Dave

It depends upon what exactly your specimen is ?

Your question needs to be more descriptive of the
part and your current DPI method, before anyone
can give you a worthwhile answer.

Dave Wilkes
NDTCabin




    
 
 
Dave ronson
Dave ronson
06:01 Mar-16-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
: Dave
.
: It depends upon what exactly your specimen is ?
.
: Your question needs to be more descriptive of the
: part and your current DPI method, before anyone
: can give you a worthwhile answer.
.
: Dave Wilkes
: NDTCabin
.
Further to my request on finding a successful method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. The type of parts I am working with are aircraft engine components which can range from Aluminum cast housings to thin Hastoly X material. Much of the thin material will have areas where the metal has been folded over and spot welded, leaving a potential area for penetrant to get trapped behind. Masking this area is not an option.As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc



    
 
 
Dave Utrata
R & D,
Center for NDE, Iowa State University, USA, Joined Feb 2000, 37

Dave Utrata

R & D,
Center for NDE, Iowa State University,
USA,
Joined Feb 2000
37
06:13 Mar-16-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
One option might be ultrasonic cleaning, which we use in our lab on occasion.

I would recommend you contact my colleague, Brian Larson, who has done literature reviews for the FAA on this subject. You can get his e-mail address from here: http://www.cnde.iastate.edu/cnde/personnel/Brian_F_Larson.htm


: Further to my request on finding a successful method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. The type of parts I am working with are aircraft engine components which can range from Aluminum cast housings to thin Hastoly X material. Much of the thin material will have areas where the metal has been folded over and spot welded, leaving a potential area for penetrant to get trapped behind. Masking this area is not an option.As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc
.



    
 
 
Patrick Chan
Patrick Chan
02:11 Oct-28-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Dave Utrata at 06:13 Mar-16-2001 .

This most happens in braze joints. Remnant remains of penetrant material is inevitable and it'll normally not a concern when subject to futher heating like engine test runs as they'll probably be burnt off.

    
 
 
Tim
Tim
13:35 Oct-28-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Dave Ronson at 05:35 Mar-12-2001 (Opening).

Assuming that you are using fluorescent penetrant, an aqueous cleaning method will yield good results. As Mr. Utrata mentioned, the addition of ultrasonics would help.

Residue removal should be done as soon as possible after the inspection.

    
 
 
Liu
Engineering,
Aerospace, China, Joined Feb 2010, 9

Liu

Engineering,
Aerospace,
China,
Joined Feb 2010
9
04:16 Nov-04-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Tim at 13:35 Oct-28-2013 .

Aqueous method is good method, but you may use electristatic method to apply penetrant to avoid excess penetrant left on the area. So, you may reduce the difficulty of cleaning.

    
 
 

Product Spotlight

XRHRobotStar

In high volume industries like automotive the requirement for a hundred percent X-ray inspection c
...
reates a bottleneck in the production. The XRHRobotStar is a fully Automated Defect Recognition (ADR) capable robot-system that allows an ultra-fast in-line inspection.
>

Conformable wedge transducer

The conformability is obtained with a flexible membrane filled with water between the transducer and
...
the inspected component. The coupling between the membrane and the component requires a small quantity of water or couplant. The conformable wedge combines the acoustic performance of immersion technique with good coupling and low attenuation.
>

MUSE Mobile Ultrasonic Equipment

The MUSE, a portable ultrasonic imaging system, was developed for in-field inspections of light-weig
...
ht structures. The MUSE consists of a motor-driven manipulator, a water circulation system for the acoustic coupling and a portable ultrasonic flaw detector (USPC 3010). The MUSE provides images of internal defects (A-, B-,C- and D-scan).
>

Mentor UT – Ultrasonic Phased Array Flaw Detector

With Mentor UT, you get an accessible and efficient inspection experience. Create user-defined menus
...
and workflows (“apps”) with GE’s desktop software Mentor Create to ensure consistency, even for the most complex inspections, every time. Mentor UT is the first UT device to easily allow wireless connectivity and live streaming, so you get second opinions when you need them most—in real-time.
>

Share...
We use technical and analytics cookies to ensure that we will give you the best experience of our website - More Info
Accept
top
this is debug window