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Technical Discussions
Dave Ronson
Dave Ronson
05:35 Mar-12-2001
Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection

I am looking for a method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc.


    
 
 
Dave Wilkes
Dave Wilkes
08:16 Mar-15-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
Dave

It depends upon what exactly your specimen is ?

Your question needs to be more descriptive of the
part and your current DPI method, before anyone
can give you a worthwhile answer.

Dave Wilkes
NDTCabin




    
 
 
Dave ronson
Dave ronson
06:01 Mar-16-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
: Dave
.
: It depends upon what exactly your specimen is ?
.
: Your question needs to be more descriptive of the
: part and your current DPI method, before anyone
: can give you a worthwhile answer.
.
: Dave Wilkes
: NDTCabin
.
Further to my request on finding a successful method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. The type of parts I am working with are aircraft engine components which can range from Aluminum cast housings to thin Hastoly X material. Much of the thin material will have areas where the metal has been folded over and spot welded, leaving a potential area for penetrant to get trapped behind. Masking this area is not an option.As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc



    
 
 
Dave Utrata
R & D,
Center for NDE, Iowa State University, USA, Joined Feb 2000, 37

Dave Utrata

R & D,
Center for NDE, Iowa State University,
USA,
Joined Feb 2000
37
06:13 Mar-16-2001
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
One option might be ultrasonic cleaning, which we use in our lab on occasion.

I would recommend you contact my colleague, Brian Larson, who has done literature reviews for the FAA on this subject. You can get his e-mail address from here: http://www.cnde.iastate.edu/cnde/personnel/Brian_F_Larson.htm


: Further to my request on finding a successful method of cleaning that would efficiently remove excess penetrant from surfaces that are hidden or difficult to access. The type of parts I am working with are aircraft engine components which can range from Aluminum cast housings to thin Hastoly X material. Much of the thin material will have areas where the metal has been folded over and spot welded, leaving a potential area for penetrant to get trapped behind. Masking this area is not an option.As we all know these areas if not cleaned sufficently will continue to bleed, of which effects further processes that the part could be going through, ie. thermal spray, welding, painting, plating etc
.



    
 
 
Patrick Chan
Patrick Chan
02:11 Oct-28-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Dave Utrata at 06:13 Mar-16-2001 .

This most happens in braze joints. Remnant remains of penetrant material is inevitable and it'll normally not a concern when subject to futher heating like engine test runs as they'll probably be burnt off.

    
 
 
Tim
Tim
13:35 Oct-28-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Dave Ronson at 05:35 Mar-12-2001 (Opening).

Assuming that you are using fluorescent penetrant, an aqueous cleaning method will yield good results. As Mr. Utrata mentioned, the addition of ultrasonics would help.

Residue removal should be done as soon as possible after the inspection.

    
 
 
Liu
Engineering,
Aerospace, China, Joined Feb 2010, 9

Liu

Engineering,
Aerospace,
China,
Joined Feb 2010
9
04:16 Nov-04-2013
Re: Post cleaning after Penetrant Inspection
In Reply to Tim at 13:35 Oct-28-2013 .

Aqueous method is good method, but you may use electristatic method to apply penetrant to avoid excess penetrant left on the area. So, you may reduce the difficulty of cleaning.

    
 
 

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