where expertise comes together - since 1996 -

The Largest Open Access Portal of Nondestructive Testing (NDT)

Conference Proceedings, Articles, News, Exhibition, Forum, Network and more

where expertise comes together
- since 1996 -

704 views
Technical Discussions
A K Das
A K Das
07:39 Sep-26-2003
Bandwidth of UT equipment required for driving a probe

Dear Members of this forum,

I would like to have technical help on the following issue:

-What should be the bandwidth (narrow, broad) for driving a UT probe in genral

-Can a UT equipment having 20 MHZ 3 dB bandwidth be used for driving a 25 MHz straight beam probe with delayline. In case it could be used, then with what limitations?

Wish to have your valuable guidance on this issue
thanks to you all

Anil.


    
 
 
Ed Ginzel
R & D, -
Materials Research Institute, Canada, Joined Nov 1998, 1219

Ed Ginzel

R & D, -
Materials Research Institute,
Canada,
Joined Nov 1998
1219
05:01 Sep-27-2003
Re: Bandwidth of UT equipment required for driving a probe
Mr. Das:
By "driving" a probe I think you mean to pulse it with a voltage. Pulsers are usually of 3 types, spike, squarewave or tone-burst. The latter 2 usually have some "tuning" ability so you can match the piezo element displacement timing with the applied voltage cycle(s). By tuning closely to the natural mechanical vibration you can optimise element displacement. Thereby, the transmitted pulse provides a maximum particle displacement. This usually results in a smaller frequency content in the pulse. By tuning longer or shorter voltage durations than the natural resonance of the element you reduce the maximum displacement in the element but increase the frequency content (i.e. increase bandwidth).

The 3dB bandwidth of the "instrument" you refer to seems to relate to the receiver portion of the circuit. This would suggest that the centre frequency of the receiver is located at 20MHz, or perhaps the range between the upper and lower frequency region between the 3dB drop points is 20MHz.

In anycase, this sounds like the receiver could also be sensitive to the pulse generated by a "nominal" 25MHz probe. Most maunfacturers assess probe frequency content in an immersion setup. If you were to do on FFT on the interface signal of the delayline to air you would probably find that the centre frequency has already dropped to well below the nominal 25MHz as a result of higher frequencies being absorbed in the delayline. If the electrical matching between the probe and instrument are adequate you should be able to use the probe with the instrument and get useful signals.
Ed
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Dear Members of this forum,
: I would like to have technical help on the following issue:
: -What should be the bandwidth (narrow, broad) for driving a UT probe in genral
: -Can a UT equipment having 20 MHZ 3 dB bandwidth be used for driving a 25 MHz straight beam probe with delayline. In case it could be used, then with what limitations?
: Wish to have your valuable guidance on this issue
: thanks to you all
: Anil.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 
Edi Suranta Perangin-angin
NDT Inspector
PT. Growth Asia, Indonesia, Joined May 2003, 1

Edi Suranta Perangin-angin

NDT Inspector
PT. Growth Asia,
Indonesia,
Joined May 2003
1
00:16 Oct-06-2003
Re: Bandwidth of UT equipment required for driving a probe
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Mr. Das:
: By "driving" a probe I think you mean to pulse it with a voltage. Pulsers are usually of 3 types, spike, squarewave or tone-burst. The latter 2 usually have some "tuning" ability so you can match the piezo element displacement timing with the applied voltage cycle(s). By tuning closely to the natural mechanical vibration you can optimise element displacement. Thereby, the transmitted pulse provides a maximum particle displacement. This usually results in a smaller frequency content in the pulse. By tuning longer or shorter voltage durations than the natural resonance of the element you reduce the maximum displacement in the element but increase the frequency content (i.e. increase bandwidth).
: The 3dB bandwidth of the "instrument" you refer to seems to relate to the receiver portion of the circuit. This would suggest that the centre frequency of the receiver is located at 20MHz, or perhaps the range between the upper and lower frequency region between the 3dB drop points is 20MHz.
: In anycase, this sounds like the receiver could also be sensitive to the pulse generated by a "nominal" 25MHz probe. Most maunfacturers assess probe frequency content in an immersion setup. If you were to do on FFT on the interface signal of the delayline to air you would probably find that the centre frequency has already dropped to well below the nominal 25MHz as a result of higher frequencies being absorbed in the delayline. If the electrical matching between the probe and instrument are adequate you should be able to use the probe with the instrument and get useful signals.
: Ed
: : Dear Members of this forum,
: : I would like to have technical help on the following issue:
: : -What should be the bandwidth (narrow, broad) for driving a UT probe in genral
: : -Can a UT equipment having 20 MHZ 3 dB bandwidth be used for driving a 25 MHz straight beam probe with delayline. In case it could be used, then with what limitations?
: : Wish to have your valuable guidance on this issue
: : thanks to you all
: : Anil.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 

Product Spotlight

Ultrasonic tomograph for imaging of concrete structures А1040 MIRA

Applicable for concrete inspection allowing imaging of the internal structure of objects from conc
...
rete, reinforced concrete, different stones. The operation applies pulse-echo technique at one-side access to the object. The instrument is feasible for concrete inspection for searching conduct ducts, conduits, detection of foreign inclusions, holes, honeycombing, cracks and other concrete defects.
>

Wireless TOFD scanner

Quick, accurate and highly reproducible welds testing. The System operates wirelessly and is compat
...
ible with any type of Windows based Laptop, Desktop or Tablet.
>

Webinar: FMC & Advanced Focusing Techniques for Improved Ultrasonic Inspections

Phased array ultrasound is now a commonly accepted inspection technology. Now there is excitement ar
...
ound new techniques in Phased Array: Full Matrix Capture (FMC) & Total Focusing Method (TFM). Our webinar on December 5 & 6 will illustrate how these techniques, implemented on a TOPAZ64 instrument, can improve the results of existing inspections. Register today.
>

NEW - TD Focus-ScanRX

The NEW Next Generation Advanced UT platform, TD Focus ScanRX - Also available as a card stack solut
...
ion. Key Improvements 1. Data acquisition is significantly faster than current design 2. Better aesthetic – closely aligns with HandyScan RX 3. Improved IP rating (Target IP66) 4. Ruggedized housing 5. Connectors are protected from impact and ingress 6. Integrated stand and separate retractable handle easy to keep clean) 7. Touchscreen with ruggedized display glass 8. 3-Axis encoder input
>

Share...
We use technical and analytics cookies to ensure that we will give you the best experience of our website - More Info
Accept
top
this is debug window
s