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Technical Discussions
Larry
Larry
00:16 Mar-26-2004
UT Acceptance Criteria

I seem to recall some code in which the acceptance criteria depends on which third of the weld the defect lies in (top third, bottom third, or middle third). I dont recall what code this is, can some one please refresh my memory. I do remember that you could basically have a lot of defects in the middle third due to the low stress in that area, (neutral axis).


 
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Bud
Bud
00:43 Mar-28-2004
Re: UT Acceptance Criteria
You may be thinking of ASME Section XI, where the lower or inner one third is inspected with volumetric methods (UT/RT) and the upper or outer one third with surface methods (MT/PT/VT). Acceptance criteria is based on size of recorded indications (length) and location.




 
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John Woollven
John Woollven
08:45 Mar-29-2004
Re: UT Acceptance Criteria
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: I seem to recall some code in which the acceptance criteria depends on which third of the weld the defect lies in (top third, bottom third, or middle third). I dont recall what code this is, can some one please refresh my memory. I do remember that you could basically have a lot of defects in the middle third due to the low stress in that area, (neutral axis).
------------ End Original Message ------------

I believe what you may be referring to is ANSI/AWS D1.1 or its Canadian cousin CSA W59. For some of the techniques, different angle beams are specified for the top quarter, middle half and bottom quarter.



 
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Larry
Larry
01:32 Mar-30-2004
Re: UT Acceptance Criteria
No its not D1.1 or W59, that refers to scanning techniques, what I was referring to was when an indication is found, the location (top, middle or bottom third) will determine whether its rejectable since each section has different requirements, as I said earlier I am pretty sure you are allowed a lot in the middle third due to the lower stresses.


----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : I seem to recall some code in which the acceptance criteria depends on which third of the weld the defect lies in (top third, bottom third, or middle third). I dont recall what code this is, can some one please refresh my memory. I do remember that you could basically have a lot of defects in the middle third due to the low stress in that area, (neutral axis).
: I believe what you may be referring to is ANSI/AWS D1.1 or its Canadian cousin CSA W59. For some of the techniques, different angle beams are specified for the top quarter, middle half and bottom quarter.
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
 Reply 
 
sujay
sujay
00:14 Nov-10-2004
Re: UT Acceptance Criteria
dear sir ,what are acceptance ceritaria forabove subject,as per asme section 8kindly sent the that to my id
thanking you,
yours faithfully
sujay----------- Start Original Message -----------
: No its not D1.1 or W59, that refers to scanning techniques, what I was referring to was when an indication is found, the location (top, middle or bottom third) will determine whether its rejectable since each section has different requirements, as I said earlier I am pretty sure you are allowed a lot in the middle third due to the lower stresses.
:
: : : I seem to recall some code in which the acceptance criteria depends on which third of the weld the defect lies in (top third, bottom third, or middle third). I dont recall what code this is, can some one please refresh my memory. I do remember that you could basically have a lot of defects in the middle third due to the low stress in that area, (neutral axis).
: : I believe what you may be referring to is ANSI/AWS D1.1 or its Canadian cousin CSA W59. For some of the techniques, different angle beams are specified for the top quarter, middle half and bottom quarter.
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
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