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- since 1996 -
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Technical Discussions
Amry Amin
R & D
Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research, Malaysia, Joined Aug 2002, 4

Amry Amin

R & D
Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research,
Malaysia,
Joined Aug 2002
4
09:41 Dec-07-2004
Flatness of ut probe face

Hi ,


In EN12668-2, it is mentioned that to measure flatness of contact probes use a ruler or feeler gauges. The gap over the whole probe face shall not be larger than 0.05mm. Can anyone please advice on the method to be used. Thanks.


    
 
 Reply 
 
Phil Herman Jr.
Sales, - Manufacture of NDT Reference Standards/Test Blocks
PH Tool Reference Standards, USA, Joined Oct 1999, 79

Phil Herman Jr.

Sales, - Manufacture of NDT Reference Standards/Test Blocks
PH Tool Reference Standards,
USA,
Joined Oct 1999
79
09:35 Dec-07-2004
Re: Flatness of ut probe face
Amry,

It will be difficult using a ruler or feeler gage to determine if the flatness over the probe face is less than 0.05mm (0.002"). To perform this check accurately, you need a dial indicator (aka test indicator). This is a common inspection tool used in the toolmaking trades, that measures flatness and other dimensional features by the amount of movement of the indicating arm. The movement, or variation is displayed on a clock-like dial which reads in MMs or thousandths of an inch. Set up the probe in a small vise or vee-block with the face up, and place the indicator in a surface gage to hold it. Move the surface gage base over a granite surface plate or other flat surface so that the indicator arm travels over the probe face. Set a 'zero' on the indicator by rotating the ring to 0. Observe the minumum and maximum readings and ensure the total indicator reading (TIR) does not exceed the allowable flatness.


----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Hi ,
:
: In EN12668-2, it is mentioned that to measure flatness of contact probes use a ruler or feeler gauges. The gap over the whole probe face shall not be larger than 0.05mm. Can anyone please advice on the method to be used. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 Reply 
 
DREW
DREW
01:08 Sep-02-2005
Re: Flatness of ut probe face
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Amry,
: It will be difficult using a ruler or feeler gage to determine if the flatness over the probe face is less than 0.05mm (0.002"). To perform this check accurately, you need a dial indicator (aka test indicator). This is a common inspection tool used in the toolmaking trades, that measures flatness and other dimensional features by the amount of movement of the indicating arm. The movement, or variation is displayed on a clock-like dial which reads in MMs or thousandths of an inch. Set up the probe in a small vise or vee-block with the face up, and place the indicator in a surface gage to hold it. Move the surface gage base over a granite surface plate or other flat surface so that the indicator arm travels over the probe face. Set a 'zero' on the indicator by rotating the ring to 0. Observe the minumum and maximum readings and ensure the total indicator reading (TIR) does not exceed the allowable flatness.
:
: : Hi ,
: :
: : In EN12668-2, it is mentioned that to measure flatness of contact probes use a ruler or feeler gauges. The gap over the whole probe face shall not be larger than 0.05mm. Can anyone please advice on the method to be used. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 Reply 
 
DREW
DREW
01:08 Sep-02-2005
Re: Flatness of ut probe face
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Amry,
: It will be difficult using a ruler or feeler gage to determine if the flatness over the probe face is less than 0.05mm (0.002"). To perform this check accurately, you need a dial indicator (aka test indicator). This is a common inspection tool used in the toolmaking trades, that measures flatness and other dimensional features by the amount of movement of the indicating arm. The movement, or variation is displayed on a clock-like dial which reads in MMs or thousandths of an inch. Set up the probe in a small vise or vee-block with the face up, and place the indicator in a surface gage to hold it. Move the surface gage base over a granite surface plate or other flat surface so that the indicator arm travels over the probe face. Set a 'zero' on the indicator by rotating the ring to 0. Observe the minumum and maximum readings and ensure the total indicator reading (TIR) does not exceed the allowable flatness.
:
: : Hi ,
: :
: : In EN12668-2, it is mentioned that to measure flatness of contact probes use a ruler or feeler gauges. The gap over the whole probe face shall not be larger than 0.05mm. Can anyone please advice on the method to be used. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




    
 
 Reply 
 

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