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- since 1996 -
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Technical Discussions
Gamma Guy
Gamma Guy
05:04 Nov-10-2005
D7 Film with Gamma

Is it acceptable to use Agfa D7 or equivalent film with gamma radiography?


 
 Reply 
 
Collin Maloney
NDT Inspector, - Plant Inspector
Applus RTD, Australia, Joined Nov 2000, 147

Collin Maloney

NDT Inspector, - Plant Inspector
Applus RTD,
Australia,
Joined Nov 2000
147
09:24 Nov-11-2005
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Is it acceptable to use Agfa D7 or equivalent film with gamma radiography?
------------ End Original Message ------------

Most certainly is, only constraint is client specification or if high sensitivity is requirement for the job.


 
 Reply 
 
P V SASTRY
R & D, NDT tecniques metallurgy
TAKEN VRS FROM THE POSITION OF SR. DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER BHEL CORPORATE R&D, India, Joined Jan 2003, 195

P V SASTRY

R & D, NDT tecniques metallurgy
TAKEN VRS FROM THE POSITION OF SR. DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER BHEL CORPORATE R&D,
India,
Joined Jan 2003
195
01:11 Nov-11-2005
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Is it acceptable to use Agfa D7 or equivalent film with gamma radiography?
------------ End Original Message ------------

The answer is yes. Further you can use D4 or even D2 if the corespondingly increased exposure times and cost are acceptable.


 
 Reply 
 
bighorn30
bighorn30
06:58 Nov-11-2005
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : Is it acceptable to use Agfa D7 or equivalent film with gamma radiography?
: The answer is yes. Further you can use D4 or even D2 if the corespondingly increased exposure times and cost are acceptable.
------------ End Original Message ------------

You didnt state the variables: material type, thickness, source type and service requirements.
If it is S.S, CuNiFe or Al then I would recommend D4 with Ir 192 (if thats the source you are using)
If C.S Then D7 is acceptable or go for D5 for a better quality graph. As said by someone else here, it all depends on the Clients requirement - he should know what he wants, although sometimes they dont !!
If its for nuclear application then you should be doing X-Ray IMHO.
Hope this helps.



 
 Reply 
 
john
john
01:46 Nov-11-2005
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
The type of film does not matter, D7, D4 or whatever is used, every standard I have ever worked to specifies the grain size requirements rather than the film manufacturer. Is D7 equivalent to Fuji 100 or maybe AX. The only difference as specified in any specifiction I have ever read is relating to the the grain size of the film. NOT THE MANUFACTURER OR GRADE OF THE FILM----------- Start Original Message -----------
: : : Is it acceptable to use Agfa D7 or equivalent film with gamma radiography?
: : The answer is yes. Further you can use D4 or even D2 if the corespondingly increased exposure times and cost are acceptable.
: You didnt state the variables: material type, thickness, source type and service requirements.
: If it is S.S, CuNiFe or Al then I would recommend D4 with Ir 192 (if thats the source you are using)
: If C.S Then D7 is acceptable or go for D5 for a better quality graph. As said by someone else here, it all depends on the Clients requirement - he should know what he wants,although sometimes they dont !!
: If its for nuclear application then you should be doing X-Ray IMHO.
: Hope this helps.
------------ End Original Message ------------





 
 Reply 
 
sandeep
sandeep
11:25 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to john at 01:46 Nov-11-2005 .

Can any one give the exposure time difference between D2, D4 & D7 Films using Ir192 for CS material.

 
 Reply 
 
shaffique
NDT Inspector,
oil and Gas Refinery, South Africa, Joined Dec 2012, 2

shaffique

NDT Inspector,
oil and Gas Refinery,
South Africa,
Joined Dec 2012
2
12:35 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to sandeep at 11:25 Oct-04-2013 .

Check the manufactures film factor for those types.

 
 Reply 
 
davetherave
davetherave
13:00 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to shaffique at 12:35 Oct-04-2013 .

I thought the film type would be in the procedure.

 
 Reply 
 
sandeep
sandeep
15:50 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to davetherave at 13:00 Oct-04-2013 .

I was asking the exposure time difference between D4 films and D7 Films. (Is it 2 times or 4 times)

 
 Reply 
 
Gerald R. Reams
Engineering,
Industry, USA, Joined Aug 2012, 181

Gerald R. Reams

Engineering,
Industry,
USA,
Joined Aug 2012
181
16:16 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to sandeep at 15:50 Oct-04-2013 .

Do you have access to the manufacturer's exposure charts or to your film sales representative? The film exposure charts are simple to use. That is what each of us would have to do to calculate the exposure factor.

Regards,
Gerald

 
 Reply 
 
shahid
NDT Inspector,
Pakistan, Joined Mar 2013, 10

shahid

NDT Inspector,
Pakistan,
Joined Mar 2013
10
17:00 Oct-04-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to sandeep at 15:50 Oct-04-2013 .

its 3 time from D7 exposure times,for D7 F.F is 120 and for D7 F.F is 40.

 
 Reply 
 
LK
NDT Inspector,
Norway, Joined May 2008, 104

LK

NDT Inspector,
Norway,
Joined May 2008
104
00:24 Oct-05-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to sandeep at 11:25 Oct-04-2013 .

D7=1
D5=1.6
D4=2.5
D3=4.2
roughly

 
 Reply 
 
Matt
Matt
09:07 Oct-07-2013
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to P V SASTRY at 01:11 Nov-11-2005 .

I heard that C1 (D2) Films are rather hard to get (especially in bigger sizes) and cost a fortune.

Without further Information this Question cannot be answered...

 
 Reply 
 
Tom burke
Tom burke
01:21 Feb-26-2018
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to Gamma Guy at 05:04 Nov-10-2005 (Opening).

In answer to your question I would say is YES!!
The quality of a Radiograph is usually measured by the ability to prove sensitivity on the image quality indicator, plaque type or wire. This gives the film interpreter an idea of what types of definition and contrast has been achieved and what type of defects he can see.
Better contrast and lattitude or clarification of any defects can be obtained with using a slower speed finer grained film.

Hence the reason that a customer or manufacturer will CLASS the types of film giving the recommended thickness range for differing film speeds. For example you would use D2 for schedule 10s 3” to show the 2T on a 10 penny. But D7 to show a 10 wire on something over 2” thick shot with iridium.
If you were to use cobalt for the same shot you could use D5 and probably see the 3 wire. So it depends upon a lot of factors and what level of sensitivity you are trying to achieve. Or customer specs.
Hope that this brief explanation helps.

 
 Reply 
 
Dr. Uwe Zscherpel
Director,
BAM Berlin, Germany, Joined Jan 2010, 81

Dr. Uwe Zscherpel

Director,
BAM Berlin,
Germany,
Joined Jan 2010
81
08:57 Feb-26-2018
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to Tom burke at 01:21 Feb-26-2018 .

Be carefully!
AGFA D7 is a system class C5 film according to ISO 11699-1. If you make radiographic inspection according to testing class B and ISO 5579 or ISO 17636-1, than film system class C5 is NOT sufficient for testing class B even when using isotopic radiation sources.
Instead, you have to use AGFA D5 for testing class B.
Uwe Z.

 
 Reply 
 
mohammed hisham
mohammed hisham
14:19 Jan-31-2019
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to bighorn30 at 06:58 Nov-11-2005 .

does any code (ASME,ASTM) say that ? or have a limitation on using either D7 or D4 for piping work ?

 
 Reply 
 
S.Williams
S.Williams
22:56 Feb-01-2019
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to mohammed hisham at 14:19 Jan-31-2019 .

ASME stipulates sensitivity requirements not specific film types so as long as you can see the required hole or wire you are good.

 
 Reply 
 
Tahir Shahzad
Tahir Shahzad
20:50 Apr-17-2019
Re: D7 Film with Gamma
In Reply to Collin Maloney at 09:24 Nov-11-2005 .

D7 Film with Gamma but size will be same

10*40CM
10* 24 CM

1
 
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