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- since 1996 -

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Technical Discussions
Jack Johnson
Engineering
USA, Joined Feb 2006, 2

Jack Johnson

Engineering
USA,
Joined Feb 2006
2
08:54 Feb-01-2006
UT probe

Hey, Everyone,

Could you please tell me how to make a UT probe? I want to make one for my project. Thanks.


 
 Reply 
 
Ed Ginzel
R & D, -
Materials Research Institute, Canada, Joined Nov 1998, 1303

Ed Ginzel

R & D, -
Materials Research Institute,
Canada,
Joined Nov 1998
1303
03:58 Feb-01-2006
Re: UT probe
Jack:
you can see the components on the ndt.net lexicon
http://www.ndt.net/article/az/ut_idx.htm
I suggest you purchase a pre-poled element and not try making one yourself. Get one with the leads already mounted so you do not destroy the element as you try soldering on the leads with improper heat input. I do not know if you have a prerequisite for frequency but try starting off with something under 4MHz as the thicker units are more robust. After that it is just figuring out how you want to hold the parts in place and the sort of housing you will use. If your application is rudimentary then no need for a protective front face.
Have fun!
Ed


----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Hey, Everyone,
: Could you please tell me how to make a UT probe? I want to make one for my project. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
 Reply 
 
Jack Johnson
Engineering
USA, Joined Feb 2006, 2

Jack Johnson

Engineering
USA,
Joined Feb 2006
2
05:44 Feb-02-2006
Re: UT probe
Ed,
Thank you very much for your kind reply.
Could you please help me with two more questions? Where do you recommend for buying a pre-poled element? What kind of backing material for the PZT active element?


----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Jack:
: you can see the components on the ndt.net lexicon
: http://www.ndt.net/article/az/ut_idx.htm
: I suggest you purchase a pre-poled element and not try making one yourself. Get one with the leads already mounted so you do not destroy the element as you try soldering on the leads with improper heat input. I do not know if you have a prerequisite for frequency but try starting off with something under 4MHz as the thicker units are more robust. After that it is just figuring out how you want to hold the parts in place and the sort of housing you will use. If your application is rudimentary then no need for a protective front face.
: Have fun!
: Ed
:
: : Hey, Everyone,
: : Could you please tell me how to make a UT probe? I want to make one for my project. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
 Reply 
 
Eduardo Moreno
R & D, -
ICIMAF, Cuba, Joined Aug 2005, 4

Eduardo Moreno

R & D, -
ICIMAF,
Cuba,
Joined Aug 2005
4
00:35 Feb-17-2006
Re: UT probe
I recomend a PZT-5 from Morgan Matroc. Try with a 2 Mhz piezoceramic 25 mm diameter. A backing material can be made with epoxy resin with tungsten power. Connect two wires with a solder at the two faces of the ceramic and use a copper tube as a housing, with a BNC connector. Then it is important to make a front layer of a quarter of wavelength and to put an inductance in paralell with the wires. With a flaw detector adjust the inductance and the front layer, in order to obtain the best echo. The layer could be made with epoxig resin (AY103 with the hardering, or similar)
Best regards
eduardo moreno

----------- Start Original Message -----------
: Ed,
: Thank you very much for your kind reply.
: Could you please help me with two more questions? Where do you recommend for buying a pre-poled element? What kind of backing material for the PZT active element?
:
: : Jack:
: : you can see the components on the ndt.net lexicon
: : http://www.ndt.net/article/az/ut_idx.htm
: : I suggest you purchase a pre-poled element and not try making one yourself. Get one with the leads already mounted so you do not destroy the element as you try soldering on the leads with improper heat input. I do not know if you have a prerequisite for frequency but try starting off with something under 4MHz as the thicker units are more robust. After that it is just figuring out how you want to hold the parts in place and the sort of housing you will use. If your application is rudimentary then no need for a protective front face.
: : Have fun!
: : Ed
: :
: : : Hey, Everyone,
: : : Could you please tell me how to make a UT probe? I want to make one for my project. Thanks.
------------ End Original Message ------------




 
 Reply 
 

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